Free interactive Python tutorials for beginners

Try it, debug it, extend it
Try it, debug it, extend it: Python tutorials

Over the next few weeks I’ll hopefully be publishing a series of 20 free interactive python tutorials for beginners.

Here’s the link to the list of resources

Each activity has four sections:

Theory: what you need to know if you’re in a hurry

Try it: working code snippets that you can adapt and use

Debug it: code sabotaged with common mistakes that you can practise fixing

Extend it: open ended project ideas for your to apply what you’ve learnt.

You can track your progress through each activity and generate a free PDF certificate showing your score at the end.

The first activity is all about getting your python program to output to the screen:

What attracts you to computing

Making computing accessible for all

This series of posts aims is aimed at UK secondary school teachers to give some free ideas and resources in order to help make computing lessons engaging and inclusive in order to help attract more and more students to continue with the subject at GCSE and beyond.

When students are choosing their GCSE options they seem to love asking teachers why we chose to teach our subjects.

Often, I can almost see the cogs turning inside some of my students’ heads, weighing up whether they should choose Computing over Art; ticking off the benefits of each subject as they make the first real choice that might affect the rest of their lives.

Whatever they use to make up their mind – who teaches the subject / what their friends are choosing / what they’re good at / what they enjoy – there’s clearly a lot more that we can do to promote Computer Science as a viable, challenging, enjoyable and worthwhile option. The national figures show a pretty poor GCSE uptake of GCSE Computer Science compared to other eBacc subjects and an abysmal uptake by girls. Boys, whilst outnumbering girls at KS4 and beyond, are being outperformed by girls from KS2 onwards. So there’s definitely something not right there that needs addressing.

CAS include
CAS #include. Making computing accessible for all

I’ve been slowly working through the brilliant advice on the CAS #include site about how to ensure that my Computing lessons aren’t just catering for people like me and it strikes me that the way to be inclusive for all also looks and sounds like the way to be engaging and stretching for all. This post aims to share some of the mistakes I’ve made as well as some of the things I’m trying to put right to make sure that all students get the most out of their computing lessons, hopefully also boosting recruitment at KS4 too.

I’ve come up with 6 Cs to use as a checklist for planning engaging and inclusive computing projects:

15: Error handling in python

Just because code works once doesn’t mean that it’s always going to work. Being able to write code that doesn’t crash or behave unexpectedly when things go wrong is a really useful skill.

This tutorial guides you through how to use exception handling to control how your programs behave when things go wrong in order to avoid crashes and data loss.

Make your code cope when things go wrong
Error handling in python: Make your code cope when things go wrong

Contents:

Page 1: Intro

Page 2: The theory: learn what you need to know as fast as possible.

Page 3: Try it: try out and adapt some working python code snippets.

Page 4: Debug it: Learn how to find and fix common mistakes.

Page 5: Extend it: Choose a project idea to use your newfound python skills.

14: Reading data from a file in python

Being able to read and process data from a file is a very useful skill that can save hours of time by allowing you to automate repetitive tasks very quickly.

Use and store data in files
Reading data from a file in python

Contents:

Page 1: Intro

Page 2: The theory: learn what you need to know as fast as possible.

Page 3: Try it: try out and adapt some working python code snippets.

Page 4: Debug it: Learn how to find and fix common mistakes.

Page 5: Extend it: Choose a project idea to use your newfound python skills.

13: Writing data to a file in python

The power of python for processing data becomes even more useful when you can save the output from your program to a file.

Use and store data in files
Writing data to a file in python

Contents:

Page 1: Intro

Page 2: The theory: learn what you need to know as fast as possible.

Page 3: Try it: try out and adapt some working python code snippets.

Page 4: Debug it: Learn how to find and fix common mistakes.

Page 5: Extend it: Choose a project idea to use your newfound python skills.